Skip to main content
Armacost Library
Ask Us

CDIS 652: Research & Experimental Design: Find Evidence

Types of Clinical Research Questions

Once you've framed your question, identify the type of question you are asking.

Intervention/Therapy. The study of treatments which can include behavioral, pharmaceutical, surgical, dietary, and augmentatative strategies. 

Diagnosis/Screening. The study of methods used to identify disorders; includes the selection and interpretation of tests.

Prognosis. The study of forecasting the course of a client and their disorder over time.

Aetiology/Harm/Risk. The study of a disorders causes and risk factors.

Recommended Types of Studies

Once you've identified the type of question you're asking, look for studies designed to address your research needs. Brief explanations are provided in the right column.

Question Type Recommended Types of Studies
Intervention/Therapy
  • Systematic review
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Cohort studies
  • Case-control studies
  • Case series
Diagnosis/Screening
  • Systematic review
  • Cohort studies
  • Case-control studies
Prognosis
  • Systematic review
  • Cohort studies
  • Case series
Aetiology/Harm/Risk
  • Systematic review
  • Randomized controlled trial
  • Cohort studies
  • Case-control studies
  • Case series

 

Where to Search

Resource Systematic Reviews Randomized Controlled Trials Cohort Studies Case Series Case-Control Studies
ASHA Evidence Maps X        
Cochrane Library X X      
PubMed Health X        
PubMed Clinical Queries X X X X X
ComDisDome X X X X X
Medline X X X X X
speechBITE X X   X  
PsycINFO X   X X X

 

Types of Research Studies

Systematic reviews (SRs). SRs are studies that synthesize literature on a topic. The explosion of information makes it difficult for health care professionals to stay current with research developments. SRs help address this need by using rigorous protocols in their research methods. As a result, SRs are one of the most highly-regarded types of evidence.

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs are studies of at least two groups of participants. One group serves as the "control" and are often without symptoms, receive no treatment or an alternative treatment. The control group helps researchers compare results. Controlled trials are randomized when participants are randomly assigned to study groups.

Cohort studies. Observational studies that follow a group of participants over time in an effort to learn how factors, exposures, or other events might affect participant outcomes. 

Case series. Studies that analyze a collection of individual cases.

Case-control studies. Compares a group of cases with a given disorder against a control group without the disorder.